WORLDVIEW: World's bad news, God's Good News

RICHMOND, Va. (BP) -- Overwhelmed by the cascade of grim global headlines, a young friend of mine announced he couldn't take it anymore -- at least until tomorrow.

"I don't know why I care," he wrote. "I don't know why I bother. I check the news. Bad. All bad. Unless the news is horrible, it's bad. Why care? Why bother? Why not just play 'Angry Birds' and pretend it doesn't affect me? It sounds easier."

Perhaps you can relate. I know I do. Violence and hatred seem to rage everywhere. Wars, skirmishes and suffering flare up where we don't expect them, and where we do. Ukraine and Russia. Syria. Iraq. Israel and Gaza. West Africa.

Death and disease abound. Innocents are infected, blown out of the sky, kidnapped, driven from their homes, shot in the crossfire. In some places, the bad guys seem to be winning -- if we can even figure out who the bad guys are. It's too complicated, too confusing, too depressing. It's tempting to tune it out.

Most people do.

Not my friend, however. Despite his frustration and discouragement, I know he won't stop reading, watching, caring and praying. He's an intelligent and compassionate young man, for one thing. He's concerned about world affairs. He makes a point of keeping up with what's happening and tries to understand it, unlike many others.

Most important, as a child of God, he's in touch with the mind and heart of God, who so loved the world that He gave His only Son to redeem it. If He loved even those who hated Him, we must do likewise.

"The one who does not love does not know God, for God is love," the apostle John teaches. "By this the love of God was manifested in us, that God has sent His only begotten Son into the world so that we might live through Him. In this is love, not that we loved God, but that He loved us and sent His Son to be the propitiation for our sins. Beloved, if God so loved us, we also ought to love one another. No one has seen God at any time; if we love one another, God abides in us, and His love is perfected in us. By this we know that we abide in Him and He in us, because He has given us of His Spirit. We have seen and testify that the Father has sent the Son to be the Savior of the world" (1 John 4:8-14, NASB).

It's only His love, through His Spirit, that changes a broken world. By His grace, He chooses to use us, if we submit to Him. His love is more than enough to make up for our lack of it.

Another young person I know, on a youth mission trip to Amsterdam, the Dutch capital, arrived the same week in July that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur was shot down over Ukraine, killing all 283 passengers and 15 crew members. Two-thirds of the passengers were Dutch. People on the streets of Amsterdam were just beginning to experience the shock of the tragedy as my friend and others on the youth team walked through the city and distributed more than 6,000 copies of the Gospel of John.

Some people they encountered rejected the small gift of truth. Like many Europeans, the Dutch consider themselves secular and post-Christian. But many accepted it -- many more than the Amsterdam-based Christian worker helping the young people expected -- and they began reading it. Perhaps they were looking for something to hold on to, something to hope in.

While interacting with them, my young acquaintance learned some things about herself. She realized she wasn't as tolerant, as patient or as loving as she thought she was.

"But through learning all these 'I am nots,' I learned who God is," she said. Distributing the Gospel, "even if they were going to reject it a second later, is so much more important than my comfort.... I learned to really care for and love the Dutch people."

So it is with all who seek to follow Him. It's not who we are; it's who He is. And He has overcome the world.


Erich Bridges is the International Mission Board's global correspondent. Explore ways to venture into the world to share the Gospel at http://going.imb.org/.

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